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 Fish Report
   

Rainbow trout being released


Fishing Regulations, Fish Counts, etc
  • To view the WDFW Weekender Report, click here ...
  • For USGS stream flow information, click here ...
  • For 10-day USGS meteorlogical stream forecasts, click here ...
  • To read 2013 - 2014 Fishing in Washington Sportfishng Pamphlet, click here ...
  • To report a poacher, click here...
  • The Corps of Engineers and other agencies that operate dams on the Columbia River count various species of fish migrating over the dams.  To see the counts of fish, Click here...
  • The Fish Passage Center, operated by the Columbia Basin Fisheries Agencies and Tribes, is another resource for fish counts.  To view, Click here ...

For Fishing Reports on Local Lakes & Streams try some of these links -


A Yakima River Fishing Story 


Getting up at 5:30 am on a Saturday morning is not usually something I do-if I can help it-but when given the chance to hit the Yakima River with other members of TU-I didn’t even need an alarm clock.

We met up at the Preston park and ride at 7-it was still dark-and soon headed off for the river. The weather was foggy for a lot of the way-punctuated by breaks in the overcast that revealed a beautiful sunrise over the Cascades-and the promise of an excellent day of fishing. After about an hour and a half trip we rendezvoused at Red’s fly shop to collect the Clackacraft boats that we’d use for the day. By 10 we were on the water.

Mark Taylor and I shared one of the three boats, and Mark was gracious enough to test his ability to guide the boat down the river at the beginning. I tied on a big stimulator and a small nymph dropper. Before we knew it, we were on our way downstream, making our way as best we could, within casting range of the chosen bank. There’s no better way to fish a large river like the Yakima-access from the bank is limited and as most fishermen would agree-the spot you want to cast to is always on the other side of the river. With the drift boat that’s not a problem-you just turn the boat and row across. It’s very exciting-coasting down the river and concentrating as best you can on the cast you have out-all while trying to plan your next one. Nothing to catch your back-cast (generally speaking) except the person rowing the boat!

One thing about the drift boat is that you typically only get one chance to hit any spot-maybe a cast or two if you are lucky-and then you’re on to the next one. There are spots where you can beach the boat and get out for some walking and wading. Just make sure the anchor is out when you do that!

I managed to tie in to a nice fish-it ended up being 15 or so inches long-and that got the day off to a good start. Though it was a little cool in the morning-about 35 degrees when we met at Red’s-later on it warmed up. By noon it was completely clear-not a cloud in the sky-and we knew we had taken full advantage of an awesome fall day. That was a good feeling.

Mark and I exchanged places on the boat-he took the prime casting spot at the bow and I got to do my duty guiding the boat down the river. It’s not hard to do except you have to watch what is coming up as you drift inexorably downstream-you mainly row to miss big rocks. Of course with Clackacraft you should “fear no rock” but it isn’t fun slamming in to one! During my first turn with the oars, I admit, I hit some. At least Mark didn’t fall over board.

On this peaceful float downstream, we hooked up with enough fish to make it a good day. We also saw quite a few animals along the way, including eagles soaring from the cliffs of the canyon; a family of Rocky Mountain sheep; and a lone Elk way up in the hills. They seemed to be enjoying the weather as much as we were.

After a long day of casting hundreds of times with lots of line out, and fighting fish, and rowing, I was tired but felt great when we beached the boat back at Red’s about 5:30. I think the endorphins must have been flowing! It was a great day and I’ll treasure the memory.

Floating the Yakima is one of those great fly-fishing experiences that anyone who’s ever picked up a fly-rod should have. If you missed the October trip to the Yakima this year, then take my advice and making every effort to go next time. You’ll be happy that you did.

About Us
This is the Bellevue/Issaquah Chapter of Trout Unlimited.
 
For a list of 2014 officers and to read meeting minutes, 
go here ...

Chapter membership total - 630

To see a calendar of 2014's activities  go here ...
News
Read Dallas Cross' article explaining where the Kokanee have gone Read here...

Support our chapter by buying gear from J. Stockard Fly Fishing (http://www.JSFlyFishing.com) thru the end of July. Ten percent of your purchase will be rebated to the club. Use coupon code TU109

Read Dallas Cross' article on sturgeon fishing opportunities Read here...

Read Dallas Cross' article on fly fishing for Kamloops Trout Read here...

Read Dallas Cross' article on how fly tying is healing veterans. Read here...

Read Dallas Cross' article on waste water treatment issues. Read here...

USFWS denies endangered species listing for Lake Sammamish Kokanee Read here...

Read Dallas Cross' article on fishing for Cutthroat trout in saltwater Read here...

Read Dallas Cross' article on fishing for kings in Lake Sammamish Read here...

Our chapter has received an Embrace-a-Stream grant from TU. Read here...

Here's an op-ed in the Oregonian relating to protection of endangered salmon stocks from California to British Columbia.  Pretty interesting! To read click here...

Read Dallas Cross' latest article about fishing access rights and Washington stream access laws Read here...
Kokanee Project
Find out what we're doing to help restore the Kokanee population in Lake Sammamish here.

Read a copy of the latest plan for supplementation of late-run kokanee in Lake Sammamish Click here...

Here's Hans Berge's Kokanee presentation from the general meeting on Feb 10, 2010 Click here...

Read a Seattle Times article about Mark Taylor's work on the Kokanee project Click here...

King County Council urges protection of Lake Sammamish Kokanee Click here...

An article in the Sound News discusses the plight of Kokanee in Lake Sammamish Click here...


Bear Creek Project
Read about a new project whose goal is to enhance lower Bear Creek in Redmond Click here

Trout Unlimited is working with Water Tenders to measure the effect of pollutants from SR520 on Bear Creek water quality Read more here
Fishing Report
Where are the fishing hotspots? More importantly, where are the fish?! We're not telling! No, really, go here.
Conservation Organizations

Save Lake Sammamish

Mountains to Sea Greenway

Green Shorelines for Lake Washington and Sammamish

Sno-King Watershed Council

TU Youth
Read about Marvista  School's "Salmon in the Classroom" project...

Kids, do you have the Boy Scout fly-fishing merit badge
 More about fly-fishing merit badge

Cast for Kids Events -  September 8 - Gene Coulon Park.  For more information, click
here.

Donate
Make a donation to Bellevue-Issaquah Chapter of Trout Unlimited. Donate.

Member Info
Not a member of Trout Unlimited . . . Become a member . . .
TU Mechandise
Your place for TU Logo Product and Gift Items.
Contact Us
Sponsors 

 Save Lake Sammamish

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